802.11n Airport Extreme update allows Time Machine backups

The latest Apple update for the 802.11n Airport Extreme now allows attached USB drives to be used as Time Machine backups.

This was always a disappointing non-feature of the 802.11n Airport Extreme that though you could share a USB drive wirelessly, you couldn’t use that same drive for your Time Machine backups.

It was especially disappointing as it had been mentioned in a lot of the build-up to Leopard.

Apple’s new Time Capsule did allow that functionality, and a lot of people were disappointed that still the 802.11n Airport Extreme did not.

This update fixes that and now you can.

New guides

I have published some new guides on my website.

Leopard Guides 

How do I find my Mac (OS X) shortname for 10.5 Leopard?

How do I find a Leopard 10.5 Mac’s IP address?

Windows Vista Business Edition 

Creating a new user account on Windows Vista Business Edition

How do I find a Vista Business Edition PC’s IP address?

Installing Bonjour for Windows on a Vista Business Edition PC.

Disabling Password Protected Sharing in Windows Vista 

Windows Vista Home Edition

Creating a new user account on Windows Vista Home Edition 

How do I find a Vista Home Edition PC’s IP address? 

Upgraded the Mac mini

I have just upgraded my G4 Mac mini to Leopard. I am intending to use it as a media centre under my television.

The upgrade went fine, and EyeTV 2.5.1 seems to work just fine under Leopard.

I am running it (currently) without a keyboard or a mouse and of course being a G4 Mac mini it does not have an Apple remote.

I do have an EyeTV remote, so when watching TV, I can use that.

In the meantime, I am using VNC and screensharing to control the Mac mini and will be using either my PowerBook or an UMPC to do the controlling.

It’s connected to my Airport Extreme (802.11n) by ethernet, so the fact that it has only 802.11g won’t be too much of an issue.

I have an (old) CRT Sony television, so I am using s-video to connect the Mac mini to it, so screen resolution is quite poor, but for video and images it seems to work fine.

Mac mini

If this works out, I will probably replace it with a newer and faster Intel Mac mini. This one only had 512MB of RAM, and I would prefer at least 1GB or more.

I will write more, as we see how it works out.

Password Protected Sharing

In the two guides I have written (so far) on sharing files between Macs and Vista PCs, Sharing files between a Windows Vista Home Edition PC and a Mac running OS X Leopard 10.5 and  Sharing files between a Windows Vista Business Edition PC and a Mac running 10.4� I did not disable password protection on the Vista PCs.

This meant that users sharing files needed to enter a password (or have a matching account) in order to access shared folders on the Vista PC.

Password Protected Sharing

However if you turn off password protected sharing it is possible to share files without for the user on the remote computer who is accessing the shared folder to use a password.

Sharing files between a Windows Vista Home Edition PC and a Mac running OS X Leopard 10.5

You can use the following procedure to share files between a Windows PC running Windows Vista Home Edition and a Mac running OS X Leopard 10.5.

Sharing files between a Windows Vista Home Edition PC and a Mac running OS X Leopard 10.5

If you have Vista Business or Ultimate, you can also use the guide as the process is almost identical.